Phillip R. Brown

Retired: 1 May 1973

Wife: Karna

Children: Paul, Aislinn, Kenneth, David, Lars

Grandchildren: Daniel, Eric

 

Jobs / Assignments
1961 Lackland AFB, TX Officer Candidate School
1961-63 Loring AFB, ME Duty Forecaster, Det 14, 8 th Weather Squadron
1963-66 Loring AFB, ME Wing Weather Officer, 19 th Bomb Wing
1966-67 Norman, OK AFIT Student, University of Oklahoma
1968-70 Fuchu AS, Japan Asian Weather Central
1970-72 Offutt AFB, NE Weather Briefing Officer to CINSAC
1972-73 Offutt AFB, NE OIC Weather Support Unit, SAC Command Post
1 May 1973 Retired from Active Duty, Major
1973-74 Bellevue, NE Finish Carpenter, Osburn Construction Co.
1974-75 Omaha, NE Trainee Agent, State Farm Insurance Co.
1975-82 Caribou, ME State Farm Agent
Apr 1981 Boston, MA Ran Boston Marathon
1982-94 Orono, ME Manager, State Farm Insurance Agency
1 Apr 1994 Retired, State Farm Insurance Co.
1991-2000 Orono, ME Town Councilman
1997-2000 Orono, ME Mayor
2000-01 Belfast, ME Building Contractor
2001-Present Bellfast, ME Vice Chair, Comprehensive Planning Committee

Education
Associates in Math, Ricker College, Houlton, ME
1967 Bachelor of Arts (Meteorology), University of Oklahoma, Norman Oklahoma  

PHIL BROWN REMEMBERS . . . . As most of us remember, our 1 st Class was academically challenged with some of them going into first class with two flushes. This did not leave some of them much time to give us a bad time. What they did not know was, I had been a member of OCS class 58G for 10 weeks. Some of you may remember the short briefing sessions I used to hold whenever we had a chance. This gave 1 st Sq. a big jump and totally confused our first class, because we were so far ahead of the other squadrons. This came to an abrupt end when, one night, the whole first class arrived in my room and scared poor Stan Aldrich out of his shorts. I was marched upstairs and given the 3 rd degree on how much I newand how much had I given out to the rest of the squadron. It was great fuhn knowing what was coming next in the trainibng. I have always wondered who in our class gave me away. If I remember correctly, our first class was proud of the boys downstairs and gave us our shoe taps before anyone else had them. I can still remember marching (at 120 per min) to chow after drill 19 and hearing all of us in perfect step all the way. Ahhhh, those were the days.